This morning I was assailed by such sadness at the velocity of life—the distance I’ve travelled from my own youth, the persistence of the old regrets, the new regrets, the ability of failure to freshen itself in novel forms—that I almost crashed the car.

Denis Johnson: “The Largesse of the Sea Maiden” : The New Yorker (via aaronburch)

snowce:

Andy Warhol, Dennis Hopper screen test

(via keyframedaily)

Source: prosto-o-kino.livejournal.com

You can’t spend the rest of your life being afraid of people rejecting you, and you have to start by not rejecting yourself, you don’t deserve it. People can either accept you for who you are or they can fuck off

anonymous  (via kushandwizdom)

(via algebreak)

Source: kushandwizdom

Art and love are the same thing: It’s the process of seeing yourself in things that are not you.

Chuck Klosterman (via quotes-shape-us)

What and how much had I lost by trying to do only what was expected of me instead of what I myself had wished to do?

Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (via quotes-shape-us)

Don’t try to solve serious matters in the middle of the night.

Philip K. Dick (via quotes-shape-us)

Man only likes to count his troubles; he doesn’t calculate his happiness.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (via quotes-shape-us)

(via cinemastatic)

Source: shamelers

(via andreii-tarkovsky)

Source: hopklns

danielodowd:

Cottage by inmyhammock.com on Flickr.

danielodowd:

Cottage by inmyhammock.com on Flickr.

(via prettyin-feministsatin)

Source: danielodowd

keyframedaily:

chadhartigan:

Slacker (1991)
Richard Linklater

Watch it.

Source: chadhartigan

“The closer he looks at the child, the less he sees … The more he looks at it, there’s nothing there. He fears that the more you look at him the less you see. There isn’t anything there.” - John Hughes

(via vroombroom)

Source: davidfincherings

marypickfords:

Persona (1966)

marypickfords:

Persona (1966)

(via andreii-tarkovsky)

Source: marypickfords

cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of his early short film, From the Drain  (1967), director David Cronenberg films Stefan Nosko, with the assistance of Sound Recordist Margaret Hindson, courtesy of David Cronenberg: Virtual Exhibition.

You’d expect a bit of strangeness from David Cronenberg‘s student films, but for most of its short length, From the Drain, which he made in 1967 while attending the University of Toronto, seems to deliver strangeness of an unexpected kind. Playing more like Waiting for Godot than his later vivid-to-the point of harrowing pictures like Crash, Videodrome, or The Fly, this thirteen-minute black-and-white film, only Cronenberg’s second, presents us with two fellows seated, fully clothed, in a bathtub. The situation looks bizarre, and as soon as the players start talking, it reveals itself as even more bizarre than we’d thought: evidently, one of these men has mistaken the tub for “the Disabled War Veterans’ Recreation Center.” The conversation continues without its participants leaving their porcelain confines, making a certain kind of sense on the surface but none at all beneath. This feels almost like the realm of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, which wouldn’t debut and begin exerting its vast influence on young comedic filmmakers until 1969. —From the Drain: a creepy comedy David Cronenberg made in film school


If you are a fan of David Cronenberg, then I would absolutely recommend checking Long Live the New Flesh: The Films of David Cronenberg  (1986), Videodrome: Forging the New Flesh  (2004), and David Cronenberg and the Cinema of the Extreme  (BBC, 1997).



For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of his early short film, From the Drain  (1967), director David Cronenberg films Stefan Nosko, with the assistance of Sound Recordist Margaret Hindson, courtesy of David Cronenberg: Virtual Exhibition.

You’d expect a bit of strangeness from David Cronenberg‘s student films, but for most of its short length, From the Drain, which he made in 1967 while attending the University of Toronto, seems to deliver strangeness of an unexpected kind. Playing more like Waiting for Godot than his later vivid-to-the point of harrowing pictures like Crash, Videodrome, or The Fly, this thirteen-minute black-and-white film, only Cronenberg’s second, presents us with two fellows seated, fully clothed, in a bathtub. The situation looks bizarre, and as soon as the players start talking, it reveals itself as even more bizarre than we’d thought: evidently, one of these men has mistaken the tub for “the Disabled War Veterans’ Recreation Center.” The conversation continues without its participants leaving their porcelain confines, making a certain kind of sense on the surface but none at all beneath. This feels almost like the realm of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, which wouldn’t debut and begin exerting its vast influence on young comedic filmmakers until 1969. —From the Drain: a creepy comedy David Cronenberg made in film school

If you are a fan of David Cronenberg, then I would absolutely recommend checking Long Live the New Flesh: The Films of David Cronenberg  (1986), Videodrome: Forging the New Flesh  (2004), and David Cronenberg and the Cinema of the Extreme  (BBC, 1997).

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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